Saturday, February 24, 2018

New Measurement of Hubble Constant Brings New Puzzle

The most extensive measurement of the Hubble constant based on observations made by the Hubble telescope (how appropriate) has revealed a discrepancy between its value and those made earlier by ESA's Planck satellite.

Planck’s result predicted that the Hubble constant value should now be 67 kilometers per second per megaparsec (3.3 million light-years), and could be no higher than 69 kilometers per second per megaparsec. This means that for every 3.3 million light-years farther away a galaxy is from us, it is moving 67 kilometers per second faster. But Riess’s team measured a value of 73 kilometers per second per megaparsec, indicating galaxies are moving at a faster rate than implied by observations of the early universe.

The Hubble data are so precise that astronomers cannot dismiss the gap between the two results as errors in any single measurement or method. “Both results have been tested multiple ways, so barring a series of unrelated mistakes,” Riess explained, “it is increasingly likely that this is not a bug but a feature of the universe.”

The arXiv version of the paper can be found here.

Zz.

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